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BYOB: Bring your own BAGS!

Not bringing your own, reusable bags to the market?  Here are 10 reasons why you should! 1) A plastic shopping bag can take anywhere from 15 to 1000 years to decompose. In a compressed landfill, deprived of atmosphere to help them biodegrade, paper bags don’t fare much better. 2) Plastic bags don’t biodegrade, but are at risk for photo degradation, light exposure dissolving them into toxic polymer particles. Most often, when this happens, it happens in the ocean. 3) The cost to recycle plastic bags so outweighs their value that most recycling facilities will not take them, leading more and more to just be thrown out with the rest of the trash. 4) According to the Wall Street Journal, only 1% of plastic bags are recycled world-wide; the rest are left to live on indefinitely in landfills. 5) The United States alone uses approximately 100 billion new plastic bags per year – the average person goes through between 350 and 500. 6) Thanks to their light weight, plastic bags are the debris most likely to fly away from landfills, settling instead in trees, storm drains, beaches, and the ocean. 7) Public agencies in California alone spend over $300 million on coastal litter clean-up per year. 8) Plastic bags make up over 10% of washed-up debris polluting the US coastline. 9) According to the British Antarctic Survey, discarded plastic bags have been found as far north as the Arctic Circle and as far south as The Falkland Islands. 10) An estimated one million birds and 100,000 turtles and other sea animals die of starvation each year after ingesting discarded plastic bags...

Benefit for Brady!

  Frostville friends!  This little guy needs our help! On July 23, 2014, North Olmsted residents Dan and Mary Fessler received unexpected news about their 4 year-old son that changed their lives forever.  Brady was diagnosed with Leukemia and chemotherapy treatments have just begun.  He will continue to be treated for the next three years, so there is a long road to recovery.  Dan and Mary’s family and friends have come together to host a benefit where 100% of all money raised will assist with Brady’s care. Please see the flyer below and be a “BRADY BACKER!”.  We’d love to see you at The Benefit for Brady!  If you can’t make it, please consider donating, even small amounts add up!  Please click HERE to view the benefit’s Facebook page!  Thanks everyone!  ...

Photos from the Farm: Mini Manna Farms

“The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum, and that as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world. ”   ―     Michael Pollan,     The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals       We’re continuing our “Photos from the Farm” with Mini Manna Farms.  Owned by Rachel Wiegand and family, Mini Manna is an urban farm located in Berea, Ohio.  As you will see, this family run farm focuses on growing with a conscience.  Sustainability, kindness to our bodies and to our Earth are integral parts of their practice. “Our style of growing is very intensive, we push the limits of how much can be produced in a small amount of space through season extensions and dense plantings.  After we harvest a plant, we replenish the soil with finished compost and replant, so we actually harvest multiple times from the same space during a season.  We have a very integrated system where our chickens not only provide us with eggs, but they are very important in insect control and generating compost. Our beehives not only provide us with honey, but they pollinate as well.  That being said, we cannot grow everything. We sometimes collaborate with other local farms.  Our corn, for example, comes from an Amish farm in Ashland County, where it is picked Friday evening.  Our goal is to provide customers with the freshest produce possible.”  –Rachel Wiegand, Mini Manna Farms Mini Manna Farms is...

Farm to Table: Egg & Potato Skillet

Thank you to our Frostville friend, Kelly Zimmer, who sent us this simple and delicious recipe using ingredients she purchased at Frostville from Mini Manna Farm!  What a great weekend recipe to try!   Ingredients: 2 tbsp ghee (could also use olive oil)3 potatoes, chopped1/4 cup onions, choppedsalt & pepper, to tastesprinkle of dried thyme6 eggs, whiskedsplash of milkhandful of cheese (Kelly uses cheddar)Directions:Preheat oven to 350 F.In an oven safe skillet over medium heat, add ghee, potatoes, onions, salt, and pepper.  Sauté until the potatoes are just fork tender.  Turn off the burner.  Sprinkle the potatoes and onion mixture with thyme.In a separate bowl, whisk the eggs, milk, and any additional salt and pepper.Pour the egg mixture into the skillet with the potatoes and onions.Bake in the oven for 10 minutes.Sprinkle cheese over the top.  Bake for another 2 minutes, or until the eggs are set and the cheese is melted.   Let us know what you think!  Enjoy Frostville...

Photos from the Farm: MeadowSong Farm

“It’s amazing how knowing the story behind your food can make it taste better  (Or, if it’s a bad story, worse.).  But I also enjoy meeting farmers at the farmers market, and seeing how my food dollars can help build a new food chain in America, one devoted to health at every step: to the health of the planet and animals, the health of my family, and the health of my community.  I call shopping and eating this way “voting with your fork.” –Michael Pollan, The Omivore’s Dilemma   As promised, we’d like to start bringing you some photos of where your Frostville goods come from.  Thank you to MeadowSong Farm for sharing some photos with us this week.  Bob and Sue Sklarz, owners and operators of MeadowSong in Medina, start their own plants from seed each Spring and supplement what they don’t grow with produce from their Amish neighbor, Atlee Weaver.  They do not use pesticides on your produce, and most of their fertilization comes via courtesy of the animals on the farm (the way it should be!). As we’ve mentioned before, get to know your farmers (they might even personalize some pumpkins for your kids– as seen in the photos)!  All of our valued vendors love to talk with you and share their stories & information about their products, and Bob and Sue are no exception!  As always, please let us know what questions we can answer for you as well!  We want YOU to vote with your fork!  🙂  ...